The Hacker Mindset
Training employees to defend against hackers and teach them how to think like one.
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White Collar

Observation

Companies that want to nurture their employees skill to become better stewards of cybersecurity need to go beyond regular trainings on password security and other basic company protocols. The best and efficient way to train employees to defend against hackers is to teach them how to think like one.

Conclusion

In a lot of ways, ‘good hackers’ are the model citizens of the digital era. They are creative, curious, well-organized, persistent, and resourceful. They think in digital terms and have the curiosity and drive to figure out how technology works. They view every problem as an opportunity. They stand up for what they believe in and they want the world to be a safer place.

Solution

That’s why it’s so important for companies to introduce 'The Hacker Mindset' inside their own organization. Through hands-on cybersecurity learning and arranged company-wide competitions and games that encourage employees to figure out how cybercrime could potentially happen.

It can transform and change the way employees view and value cybersecurity, which leads to better security across the entire organization and can also help participants become more curious, innovative and resourceful.

How would you stage or advertise your hack?

To communicate 'The Hacker Mindset' encourage employees to attend hackathons, to observe or learn. These events give employees a chance to take a step back from their day-to-day work for a moment and think creatively and solve some kind of problem, which is what “hacking” is all about. The idea is to get people a different environment and exercising their mental muscles in new ways. It also makes everyone more observant and curious about the world around them, which is at the very heart of good cyber security specialist.

For more hands-on 'hacker mindset' learning, management can also arrange company-wide competitions and games that encourage employees to figure out how cybercrime could potentially happen. Organizers can even take it a step further and role play a fictitious cyber incident. Acting out a breach scenario can help employees, technical or not, better relate to organizational risk and inspire a new level of mindfulness when it comes to cybersecurity.

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