Bee Succeed
Employees switch roles/tasks one day a month.
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All

Observation

Successful teams require more than great players — they need people to play complementary roles that reinforce each other. Roles define expected behaviors — they drive clarity for both the individual performing it and the team. Fixed roles create stereotypes — they make things too predictable. When people supposed to play only one role, they are forced to play to the strengths — we limit their potential to learn new things.

Conclusion

The first step is to rethink how people work beyond titles–start by organizing the team by roles. The best way to do this is to engage the team in the process actively. Managers can introduce the notion of ‘role rotation’ and set clear rules of engagement.

Solution

Employees will switch their roles one day a month... like bees. Bees are fully imbued with the skill to go about their tasks in relative independence, but they know it’s best to work in a team. Bees switch jobs throughout their lifetime, as needed, to ensure that the hive runs efficiently. Rotating roles increases ownership of the project’s success. It helps to remove the divide between those who tend to be more vocal and those who are quieter.

How would you stage or advertise your hack?

The first step is to rethink how people work beyond titles–start by organizing the team by roles. The best way to do this is to engage the team in the process actively. Managers can introduce the notion of ‘role rotation’ and set clear rules of engagement. A role is not a title. It’s the part played by a team member in a particular situation or project. More than one person can play the same role. One person can play various parts. Roles rotation promotes a more flexible approach to approaching and tackling challenges — it encourages the team to become more adaptive to the reality of each project.